Stays true to the passion and emotion of its predecessor | Daily News
The Lion King

Stays true to the passion and emotion of its predecessor

The story of Simba, a young lion who is to succeed his father, Mufasa, as King of the Pride Lands has captured the hearts of young and old alike. After Simba's paternal uncle Scar murders Mufasa, Simba is manipulated into thinking he was responsible and flees into exile.

Upon maturation living with two wastrels, Simba is given some valuable perspective from his childhood friend, Nala, and his shaman, Rafiki, before returning to challenge Scar to end his tyranny and take his place in the Circle of Life as the rightful King.

The Lion King is a 1994 American animated musical film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The movie was directed by Roger Allers and Rob Minkoff, produced by Don Hahn, and has a screenplay credited to Irene Mecchi, Jonathan Roberts, and Linda Woolverton. Its original songs were written by composer Elton John and lyricist Tim Rice, with a score by Hans Zimmer. The film features an ensemble voice cast that includes Matthew Broderick, James Earl Jones, Jeremy Irons, Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Moira Kelly, Nathan Lane, Ernie Sabella, Rowan Atkinson, Robert Guillaume, Madge Sinclair, Whoopi Goldberg, Cheech Marin, and Jim Cummings. The story takes place in a kingdom of lions in Africa and was influenced by the lives of Joseph and Moses, from the Christian Bible, and William Shakespeare's Hamlet.

Now a remake of this well loved story is screening all over the world bringing the 1994 animated classic powerfully back into life. Of course, the characters are computer-generated but they seem so realistic. The live-action remake is true to the plot and music and makes the movie memorable.

Comedy also takes a hit in the remake directed by Jon Favreau. The humor in the animated film felt timeless and some moments of the remake too were clearly designed to elicit laughs.

The characters, for the most part, were not overshadowed by the film's star-studded cast, which includes Donald Glover (Simba), Keegan-Michael Key (Kamari), Seth Rogen (Pumbaa) and Billy Eichner (Timon). The audience was still able to see characters like Simba separate from the actors who voiced them. James Earl Jones, who lends his voice to Mufasa once again, is as commanding and powerful as in the original film, maintaining our understanding and admiration for his character.

Then there is Beyoncé. Despite the singer's immense star power, her voicing of Nala doesn't overshadow the character, but lends an air of passion and independence that could only be delivered by this talented singer. Beyoncé also shines in her singing as she lends her voice to the classic Can You Feel the Love Tonight and Spirit, a new track in the film.

Thankfully, The Lion King stays true to the passion and emotion of the music in the original. Every song in the 2019 remake, both lyrical and instrumental, effectively sets the tone throughout the film. Hakuna Matata and I Just Can't Wait to Be King are just as lively and upbeat as their animated counterparts. Ultimately, The Lion King's live-action rendition becomes too good to miss as it closely follows the steps of its predecessor.


 

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