Smart strategies for getting more women into workforce | Daily News

Smart strategies for getting more women into workforce

Women in Asia are on average 70% less likely than men to be in the labour force. This gender gap persists despite steady economic growth, increased access to education, and the desire of most working-age women to become employed.

The current gender imbalance in the workforce in Asia and the Pacific is a misallocation of talent that limits productivity and curbs economic growth. that the removal of gender bias in education, the labor market, and the household in a typical Asian economy would increase per capita income by 30% and aggregate income by 6% over a generation.

A recent Asian Development Bank study, examines the factors that have prevented women from entering the workplace and outlines a range of policies to reverse the trend.

The study presents findings from four countries the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Indonesia, the Republic of Korea, and Pakistan that together account for close to 28% of the world’s working-age women.

Each of the four countries has low or declining rates of female participation in the workforce. In the PRC, 64% of working-age women are employed, down from 73% in 1990. Indonesia’s rate is comparatively high for the region but is still only 51%. Female labor force participation in the Republic of Korea remains at a low 50% despite high levels of economic growth and per capita income. And in Pakistan, while on the rise, the female participation rate sits at just 25%.

So what accounts for these stubbornly low or declining participation rates?

Study data suggest there are several prominent constraints to female labor force participation in the four countries. These include a wide range of social and cultural norms that emphasize women’s domestic responsibilities, limit mobility, restrict the subset of jobs considered appropriate for women, and impede women’s access to information. (Development Asia)


 

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