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Citizens' Mail

Why we must respect Supreme Court

A supreme court is the highest court within the hierarchy of courts in many legal jurisdictions. Other descriptions for such courts include court of last resort, apex court, and highest (or final) court of appeal. Broadly speaking, the decisions of a supreme court are not subject to further review by any other court. Supreme courts typically function primarily as appellate courts, hearing appeals from decisions of lower trial courts, or from intermediate-level appellate courts.

The Supreme Court of Sri Lanka is the highest court of Sri Lanka. The Supreme Court is the highest and final judicial instance of record and is empowered to exercise its powers, subject to the provisions of the Constitution. The Court has ultimate appellate jurisdiction in constitutional matters, and take precedence over all lower Courts. The land judicial system is complex blend of each unwritten and civil-law. In some cases such as executing, the decision may be passed on to the President of the Republic for clemency petitions.

According to Article 118 of the Constitution, the Supreme Court is the highest and final superior court of record and is empowered to exercise original advisory and appellate judicial functions. It is conjointly the ultimate Court of Record and also the Court of attractiveness of land.

In one of the landmark judgements, the Supreme Court ruled that powers over land would continue to remain vested in the Central Government, and not the provincial councils.

The verdict assumes significance within the wake of the government’s apparent reluctance to devolve land and police powers — expressed within the thirteenth change that followed the Indo-Lanka Accord of 1987 — to its provinces. It practically killed the 13th amendment.

Therefore the citizens of Sri Lanka must abide by the Judgement delivered by the Supreme Court of Sri Lanka.

Wasantha Hettiarachchi
Mirihana


 

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